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Archive for November, 2010

Egg Benefits

I am delighted to report that our winter season eggs have maintained an incredible taste advantage over those industrial-farmed eggs you find in the supermarket. Our hens are still foraging outside every day in their winter paddock, and we still feed them all-organic feed with no antibiotics and no hormones. At night, the hens sleep in their hoophouse with natural sapling roosts and deep straw bedding. I feel good about the health benefits of the eggs and about the welfare of the hens, but when I hear my family ooh and aah over breakfast—that’s what it’s all about!

Check out these photos by Sara Maxwell

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Pork Available

Although we are sold out of beef and chicken for the rest of 2010, one consolation is that we now have pork available from our pastured pigs. Supermarket pork, as you may know, comes from confinement factory farms that always top the lists of industrial agricultural horrors. By contrast, our pigs lived very happy lives at edges of our pastures, munching on roots, grass, and acorns in addition to the organic pig feed we gave them. If you are interested, give Steve a call soon and stock up—after we sell our supply, we won’t have pork again until this time next year.

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We just had a nice visit from Dr. Marty Michener, botanist and ornithologist extraordinaire. Dr. Michener is interested in how our mob grazing system affects the plants and the soil on our farm. He took a bunch of soil samples and did a base-line inventory of the plant species in the pasture. He found 17 species in all—what’s more he knows all their names! He will come back later to measure again and see what changes happen. It is very exciting to have scientific feedback to support our management decisions.

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Recycling Day

This pig made short work of my jack-o-lantern today. I was happy not to waste it by putting it in the trash. So was the pig, evidently!

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This weekend we moved the chickens into the hoophouse, where they will spend the winter. They are only laying about a dozen eggs a day, but that should improve a lot when we add lighting to their house. They will still have an open door to roam outside during the day all winter long. However, bugs are getting scarce and green grass won’t last much longer. If you would like to experience the deep orange yolks of pastured-raised eggs, stop by soon. When the green grass is gone, the yolks will look like “regular” eggs.

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